Your rights at sport (for kids aged 7-12)

 

This information is for children aged 7 to 12 years. It helps you understand your key rights – in your everyday life and when you take part in sport.

What do we mean by “rights”?

All people, including children, have human rights. Rights are the things that all people need and that help us have a good life. Because you are a child, you also have special rights under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to help you grow up safe and healthy.

Some important rights

  • You have the right to be safe, and to feel safe. This means that no one is allowed to do things or say things that make you feel unsafe.
  • You have the right to privacy. Your body belongs to you. Nobody is allowed to touch you or take photos of your body in a way that makes you feel upset, frightened or embarrassed.
  • You have a right to be treated fairly, no matter what your ability, who you are or where you are from.

You have the right to have your say, and adults should listen to what you say. This means you should be asked about things that matter to you and what you say should be taken seriously. Human rights come with responsibilities. This means it is everyone’s job to treat other people with respect and kindness. That includes you!

If someone makes you feel upset, hurts you or touches you in a way that you don’t like or that makes you feel scared, you should tell someone. This could be a coach, a parent or carer, or any adult you trust. The right person will help you with the next steps to feeling safe. If you don’t get the help you need, you might need to talk to someone else. Keep trying until you feel heard.

How are your rights protected when you do sport?

Parents, carers and all adults at sports have a responsibility to keep you safe and respect your rights when you take part in sport.

Sports have rules to make sure...

  • You feel safe, happy and respected.
  • You are treated fairly, no matter what your ability, who you are or where you are from.
  • Your needs and feelings are recognised and respected.
  • You are asked about things that matter to you.
  • Adults listen to you and take what you say seriously.
  • You know who you can talk to if you feel upset, scared or are hurt by another person.

 

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